the last night in Portland

A genius bartender named Amy  made up a drink just for me*…she let me name it, so don’t hold her accountable for that.

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The Campfire Girl

  • 2 oz. of Sombra mezcal
  • .5 of orgeat
  • .5 of lime
  • .25 of pineapple
  • 5 drops of saline
  • 4 drops of firewater bitters
  • spray the glass with Laphroaig

Visit her at the Green Room, and if you’re the manager of same, give her a raise.

 

*and if this is a real drink, and she didn’t make it up–don’t tell me that. I prefer the fiction.

 

 

All I want for my birthday

…is for my white friends and family to do one thing today to support black liberation.

Make a donation to BlackLivesMatter, Campaign Zero, or one of the many fine local or state organizations fighting for justice. Go to a rally to support ending the extrajudicial killing of black people. Have a conversation with another white person about why you want to see an end to racist policing. (Here are some tips on how to do that.) Email a local city council person and tell them to start working on passing one of these laws. Call the district attorney in your city and tell them to stop locking people up for not being able to pay fines. Contact your mayor and tell him/her to hold cops accountable, regardless of the FOP’s endorsement.

 

For my friends and family who are people of color, particularly those who are African American–take care of yourselves. This has been a crazy-making week, and self-care matters, just like your lives.

 

I love you all.

 

 

the job to be named later

IRVING-PENN-SMALL-TRADES-5*

I’m happy to announce that as of today, I’ve joined the staff of the National Guestworkers’ Alliance.

As many of you know, when I left SEIU Healthcare PA I was really interested in starting to build new ways for workers to organize, in order to meet the challenges of our new economy. I’m excited about this move, because I think that NGA is going to give me the opportunity to do work on some of what I consider to be the most crushing problem facing workers today–the shift to increasingly precarious work. It doesn’t matter if you’re working in the gig economy online or offline–more and more of us are losing the safety net that comes with permanent, full-time work.

In some ways, this is a pretty big leap–I don’t even have a job title yet, and I’ve never worked in the alt-labor movement. But I’ve been writing and thinking about the Future of Work for almost 2.5 years over at Hack the Union, and this feels like the right fit for what I want to spend my time working on for the foreseeable future.  One of the things that really matters to me is feeling like there is values alignment around the idea that the economic justice movement can’t be forever looking to go backwards–we can’t (and shouldn’t) just rebuild the unions of the 20th century, in order to meet the challenges of the 21st.

More detail on the campaigns and things I’ll be working on as that develops. Apologies to my Pennsylvania and electoral friends, who have all been assuming I’m either joining the staff of a newly-sworn-in elected official, or jumping into a presidential campaign. And thanks to all of you for your support over the years, as I’ve tried to work out what role makes the most sense for me. I have no doubt I’ll be leaning on you again, as I move into a new role.

 

 

*photo credit–Irving Penn, from his Parisian project, Small Trades